The Happiness Edge: More Cheer, Less Gloom Over Time Linked To Better Health

Contact: Emily Willroth, PhD For Release: Immediately It’s well-documented that happier people tend to live healthier, longer lives than more…

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Childhood Adversity: Sex Differences in Puberty Effects for Puerto Rican Youth

Contact: Shakira Suglia, ScD, MS For Release: Immediately Childhood adversity, including experiences of abuse and neglect, bear a strong link…

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Loving Parents May Erase Higher Cold Virus Risk That Comes With Growing Up Poor

Contact: Sheldon Cohen, PhD For Release: Immediately Growing up with parents with few assets, a low income and little education…

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Having At Least Four Close Relationships Might Curb Mortality Risk for Widowed Older Adults

Contact: Atina Manvelian, MA For Release: Immediately The death of a spouse, an experience sure to become increasingly common for…

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Healthier Lifestyle Habits for Kids: A Possible Link with Less ADHD

Contact: Paul Veugelers For Release: Immediately About one out of every eight U.S. boys and one in 18 girls has…

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Spring 2020 President’s Message

Dear APS members, This message is to provide some important updates for APS. Following the unprecedented cancellation of our 2020…

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2020 Annual Meeting Special Edition

From the Editor’s Desk Annie Ginty, PhD APS Newsletter Editor Welcome to the Special Issue newsletter featuring the upcoming American…

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APS Introduces Fellows of APS to recognize sustained contributions and excellence in psychosomatic science

APS is pleased to announce the Fellow Status in the American Psychosomatic Society (FAPS) has been created to recognize sustained…

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How Poverty Endangers the Teeth: New Immune System Link Found

Poorer people are more likely than the better off to have periodontal disease—inflamed and bleeding gums, cavities and teeth that are so infected they must be pulled.

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Key Racial Difference Found in Health Benefits of Rising Income and Education

White adults who have reached a higher socioeconomic class across their life course tend to enjoy a drop in their inflammation levels—and so lower risk for disease—but that’s not true for blacks, a novel new study suggests.

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